Wednesday, April 1, 2015

And More Progress was Made





Finally after fighting with this damnable old plow trying to cut the extra long tang off and eating through about 10 sawzall blades along with 3 cutting wheels the thing is finished.

Now I only have to clean up the rust and add the cross bar for the three point hitch to hook onto it.

I am not sure this project was really worth it to be honest considering you can pick up an old one bottom plow ready to hook up and use for under $200.00 around here sometimes. Then again though they are usually not as heavy as this thing. From what I understand a heavy chunk of plow like this actually ends up making the plowing easier than a lighter weight one. Or so the old guys around here told me.

After cutting through the tang I took off three rusted bolts and you can see the hole just behind where I cut the tang. The two parts I freed up fit perfectly and should act as a support to bolt the new cross bar on with. In the back above the blade you can see the double hole for the top support hitch already there.

All I can say is the 12 inch or so section I removed was a heavy chunk of metal.




What I need is a good sandblasting setup to remove all this surface rust but I may have to just do it the old fashioned way (For us born after 1960) and use a drill and wire brush.  I think I may just rough it up and then apply one of those rust converter primers rather than take it down to bare metal. I mean it's lasted almost 70 years outside like it is I doubt it's gonna rust away in my lifetime.

The old boy I got it from insists it is an old 3 bottom John Deere plow from the 1940's and was used until his grandfather hit a stump with it and messed up the other two missing plow blades. The cutting wheel is stuck on it but I am hoping with all the penetrating oil I put in there it will break free when I use it. If not it's pretty much set properly for the blade anyway.

I almost got all the old hay manger and gate cut up and loaded until it started raining on me. You can see the plow getting some rain in the top picture which cut my work day a bit short as I ran around getting everything put away. Guess I will have to pick up where I left off tomorrow unless I get called out for another work run or it doesn't stop raining.

Seems this time of year I am constantly battling the rain.

Keep Prepping Everyone!!!!!!





14 comments:

  1. Maybe so, maybe not. We were supposed to have rain the last two of three days and got nothing. Maybe we will get some things weekend, although I was planning on planting the garden so I am kind of hoping it holds off.

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    1. TB - I always find myself hoping the rain will hold off this time of year and then mentally kicking myself in the butt because I know how horrible no rain ends up being. It's one of those blessings that always interrupts and annoys me :)

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  2. Don't remove the rust it may fall apart into a pile of dust.......

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    1. Rob - Nah there is some really good steel under that rust. The rust also doesn't penetrate very far, in fact on the reverse side there is actually some green paint still visible. They don't make steel like this thing is made from anymore.

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  3. 4" grinder with a wire wheel works better than a drill and a wire wheel.

    For a really good penetrant, try 'Strike Hold". (Strike-hold.com) I ahve found that it really works (especially with a bot of heat) to penetrate and loosten things which are rusted together.

    Alternatively, make yer own penetrant:

    3 part synthetic 5w-30 motor oil
    1 part kerosene or diesel.
    1 part brake fluid (Dot 3 or 4)
    1 part acetone or denatured alcohol.

    This mix is flammable, But it will soak into most porous rust in about a week. apply daily (or more often) with a brush to the rusted parts.

    If you heat with a torch (gently) before applying it, it'll soak in faster. Again, this mix is flammable. If I plan on heating, I cut the solvent down by a factor of 4 to prevent flames.

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    Replies
    1. B - That's a handy recipe to have. I have everything here to make that except the alcohol. I should treat it everyday for a few weeks now before I use it and hope that helps break the cutting wheel and shear lock free in case I hit a small stump.

      Thanks for that recipe!!!!

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  4. Use Oxalic acid to remove the rust. It comes in powdered form and here is about ten pounds for a kilo. Ideally you mix with water about 10 to 1part acid and soak but for a paste mix in cornflour. Leave for 24 hrs and wash off well. It gives off fumes so keep well ventilated and no sources of ignition! Ebay sells it here or any chemical supplier. Best to degrease before use using soapy water.

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    1. Ro - Interesting. I have never used Oxalic acid before but I have used Muratic quite a bit. Thanks for the tip I will look into it.

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    2. I should have also said if you want to neutralise the acid to dispose of it add baking soda.

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    3. Ro - Ahh the greatest neutralizer ever discovered :)

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  5. PP,

    I think you found yourself a good quality plow, just continue working on it until you get it to where you want it. Older tools will last a lifetime unlike newer ones.

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    1. Sandy - That the way I look at it. One reason I go with old tractors over the new ones. The new small plows that they have seem like garden tractor implements more than farm equipment.

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  6. That will be a good stout one once you get the hook up on it. With all that work you can paint your name on the side.

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